How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Big Boy » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:37 am

Obeying the law, educated or not will cost Thai time and money. They'll always take the shortest route, irrespective of whether it costs their life unless there's a suitable punishment to encourage them to do otherwise.

Unfortunately, many visitors feel it's essential to copy.

Make a big hole in their wallets or confiscate their vehicles - that would solve it.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Nereus » Wed Jun 28, 2017 10:33 am

While BS like the following is the norm, nothing will change:
..........................................................................................
Court backs jail for cyclist fatalities

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general ... fatalities

The Appeal Court yesterday upheld a two-year prison sentence imposed on a drink-driver who slammed her car into a group of cyclists, killing three and injuring two in May 2015. The court also ordered her to pay more compensation to the victims and their families.

The Chiang Mai provincial court yesterday handed down its ruling against Phatchuda Jairuean, 24, who was previously convicted of driving under the influence leading to death, under Section 291 of the Land Transport Act.

The sentence, handed down by the Civil Court on May 31 last year, was originally a four-year term but was commuted two years due to her confession.

On May 3, 2015, Phatchuda, who later told police she had too much to drink the previous night, crashed her car into a group of cyclists travelling on the Chiang Mai-Chiang Rai road, killing Phongthep Khamkaeo, Saman Kantha and Chairat Yonglan and injuring two other cyclists. Her blood alcohol level was also found to be higher than the legal drink-drive limit.

The court also ordered her to pay 2.33 million baht to the family of Saman, up from 1.72 million baht; and 1.18 million baht to the parents of Phongthep, up from 435,433 baht. Chairat's family had already received 1.2 million baht from an insurance firm.
Phongthep's father, Kaeo Khamkaeo said he respected the court's decision, but thought the two-year sentence was not long enough.

Phatchuda was granted bail yesterday to appeal.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by HHTel » Wed Jun 28, 2017 2:52 pm

Why different amounts for each of the 3 she killed?

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Spitfire » Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:08 pm

Tbh, 2 years and fine someone an amount they have no hope of paying for DUI and killing 3 people is absurdly low. She will be out in a year knowing how they quietly release people because their jails are beyond full.

People like this should be made an example of and this cutting the sentence in half for admitting it is ludicrous. Just my opinion though.

As an aside, you get 15 years for saying the wrong thing, mind you.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by HHTel » Wed Jun 28, 2017 6:43 pm

Or 15 years for picking a few mushrooms!!

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Big Boy » Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:06 pm

Eating, putting on makeup while driving in traffic legal, Thai police confirm - what's the point :? ?

https://coconuts.co/bangkok/news/eating ... e-confirm/
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by oakdale160 » Wed Jun 28, 2017 9:28 pm

It is ironic. One of the few advantages of a military dictatorship is that they can make huge changes immediately if they have the will. this thread is interesting but the answer to the question asked in the heading is---- There will be no change.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Nereus » Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:36 am

Drink-drivers 'ignore' penalties, experts say

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general ... xperts-say

Tougher sanctions only solution to road toll

Harsher punishments with no suspended sentences should be introduced for drink-drivers, to curb the death toll resulting from road accidents, according to the Road Safety Policy Foundation.

Speaking at a forum Thursday, Thanaphong Chinnawong, the foundation's manager of academic resources, said drink driving is responsible for a quarter of the 15,000 people killed in road accidents every year.

Health advocates are demanding stronger measures to curb the toll.

Many victims, based on death certificates recently obtained from state agencies, are pedestrians and even traffic police.
They were hit by drink drivers who ignored warnings and took advantage of weak spots in the law.

The flaw in Dr Thanaphong's view is weak penalties. Many drink drivers are only given suspended jail terms when they commit wrongdoing even though those acts claim other lives.

"But drink driving is not a careless act," he said. "It's dangerous behaviour which deserves harsh punishment with no suspended sentences."

Anti-drink driving activists campaign around Victory Monument, demanding harsher punishments for people caught driving while under the influence. (Photo by Chanat Katanyu)

In Japan, a wrongdoer in a drink-driving case can be sentenced to 20 years in jail, he said.

More social measures also must be devised because many people in society believe "drink driving is normal", Dr Thanaphong said.

Worse, more motorists are using gadgets to help them avoid roads where police checkpoints are set up.

The toll on the roads of 40 deaths a day on average, a quarter of which result from drink driving, is enough to prompt both government and civic groups to take serious action, he said.

State agencies have launched road safety campaigns, especially during the long holidays. However, Dr Thanaphong said, the death toll in accidents caused by drink drivers increased from 17% to 32%, and drink-driving-related accidents rose from 34% to 43% during the Songkran festival in April.

Most troubling is that many victims are people aged under 20.

"I believe only stronger laws, arrests and jail terms can deal with the problem," said Wichan Naisong, whose vehicle once hit a police officer seven years ago.

The officer, Snr Sgt Maj Anusak Khaminthong, suffered severe wounds and had to have his left leg amputated.
He was given a two-year suspended jail term and fined more than 10,000 baht, though also had to meet the victim's medical bills and compensation worth two million baht in total.

The 59-year-old said he never wanted to take the case to the court. "It was an expensive lesson for me," he said.
He did not want to see other drivers make the same mistake and agreed tougher penalties were needed to deter drink driving.

Snr Sgt Maj Anusak is among a number of policemen who have been injured in road accidents. Over the past three years, 49 others have fallen victim to drink drivers, Dr Thanaphong said.

"I've never forgotten that incident," Sgt Maj Anusak said.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by buksida » Sun Aug 27, 2017 4:09 pm

8,644 killed in road accidents so far this year
A total of 8,644 people were killed in road accidents nationwide from Jan 1 - Aug 26 this year, Don't Drive Drunk Foundation secretary-general Dr Taejing Siripanich revealed on Sunday.

Speaking to Daily News online, Dr Taejing said this unofficial figure was compiled by the foundation from daily reports from various networks campaigning for the prevention and reduction of road accidents throughout the country.

The monthly numbers of people killed in the road accidents were 947 in January, 850 in February, 1,281 in March, 1,388 in April, 1,124 in May, 1,128 in June, 1,021 in July and 911 from Aug 1-26.

Dr Taejing said the death toll from Jan 1 - Aug 26 was 8,644, adding that the figure was still unofficial.

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general ... -this-year
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by StevePIraq » Sun Aug 27, 2017 4:20 pm

As most people know these figures are on the low side due to the method of reporting road deaths in Thailand. Road death and casualty numbers are based on numbers taken at the scene so they do not take into account people who die on their way to or in hospital
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Thailand Road Accident Death Toll Figures Jan 1 - Aug 26

Post by Spitfire » Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:10 pm

8,644 killed in road accidents so far this year

27 Aug 2017 at 15:52 1,472 viewed2 comments
WRITER: ONLINE REPORTERS

A total of 8,644 people were killed in road accidents nationwide from Jan 1 - Aug 26 this year, Don't Drive Drunk Foundation secretary-general Dr Taejing Siripanich revealed on Sunday.

Speaking to Daily News online, Dr Taejing said this unofficial figure was compiled by the foundation from daily reports from various networks campaigning for the prevention and reduction of road accidents throughout the country.

The monthly numbers of people killed in the road accidents were 947 in January, 850 in February, 1,281 in March, 1,388 in April, 1,124 in May, 1,128 in June, 1,021 in July and 911 from Aug 1-26.

Dr Taejing said the death toll from Jan 1 - Aug 26 was 8,644, adding that the figure was still unofficial.

Source - Bangkok Post

Comment - And I bet that figure is only including those who died at the crash scene. If you included all the ones who died later at hospital or wherever then it would make an even more disturbing headline. Does say "unofficial" but no way you would get an honest official number. Still, with the above figures it works out to about 36 people a day... :shock:
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by oakdale160 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 9:52 pm

This thread is useful for ex-pat posters to vent their anger and frustrations. BUT nothing is going to change, there is no will for traffic law enforcement. Does any poster really think that this attitude will change?

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by buksida » Sun Aug 27, 2017 9:54 pm

Its not about "change" it is about increasing awareness that might one day save a life. The more foreign expats and tourists are aware of the dangers on the roads here, the more likely they are to excercise caution and be extra vigilent when using the roads.

Well that's the theory anyway!
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by oakdale160 » Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:31 am

BUksida, you have nailed it. This is the situation, it will never change. Take suitable steps to try to avoid being injured or worse. Don't waste any time, energy or keystrokes on expecting the Thai authorities to improve things.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Nereus » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:02 am

The following is interesting, although I am not sure that I agree with all of it:
...................................................................................................................
Don't only blame drivers for road tragedies

Wasant Techawongtham Freelance Reporter

https://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opi ... -tragedies

Every fatal accident is a ­tragedy and all serious accidents carry heavy human and ­financial costs.
Every day many such accidents occur on Thai roads. The high ­fatality rate has earned Thailand the dubious reputation as the country with the second most deadly roads in the world.

This has been going on for years and years, and despite public and private efforts to remedy the situation accidents continue to mount.

So far this year, more than 1,000 people on average have lost their lives each month. Between Nov 1-15, 665 people were killed. That's about 44 deaths a day. Most deaths occurred on Nov 6 when 62 people died.
It is likely we could soon surpass even these statistics.

It should be noted that the numbers I cite are of people who died at the scene of accidents. They do not include those with serious injuries who might have perished in hospital or on the way there.

The statistics, however, fail to reveal the magnitude of human suffering, grief and loss.

Take an accident in Ayutthaya on Nov 8 when a van carrying a group of Japanese tourists slammed into the back of a 10-wheel truck. Five people died. Among them were a surgeon from Kyoto and a hospital director from Osaka.
Needless to say, when alive they provided valuable services to mankind. Now, no more.

But the enormity of the losses is not always determined by the social or economic status of the victims. The loss of a spouse or a child can have an equally devastating impact.

Last Wednesday, a double-decker coach carrying more than 50 young students and their teachers hit a pickup truck that was waiting to make a right turn at a T-junction.

The accident occurred on a stretch of highway in Dan Khun Thot district of Nakhon Ratchasima that was recently expanded from two to four lanes. There are no traffic lights at the junction. The section of road on which the coach was travelling was downhill, so the momentum of the speeding vehicle increased the gravity.

Apparently, the front of the pickup truck poked too far into the oncoming lane.
The impact when the coach hit the truck sent the double decker careening over the median, cutting across the opposite lane and ending up in a ditch.

A young girl, a teacher and the coach driver died at the scene. About 50 other passengers suffered injuries, some serious.
The only good thing that can be said is that when the coach shot across the other lane, there was no oncoming traffic. Otherwise, greater loss of life would have resulted.
On the coach with the young girl were her mother and older brother, both injured seriously enough to put them in intensive care.

The girl's father told journalists that he had a phone conversation with his daughter less than an hour before the crash. He said he would not tell his wife and son of the girl's death until they were out of danger.
There are no words to describe the grief of a man who has suddenly lost a child with two loved ones still hanging on by a thread.

Numerous studies have pointed to speed and alcohol consumption as the main causes of accidents in Thailand. A few mention lack of law enforcement and road conditions. And everybody knows that Thai drivers in general have bad driving habits. So basically most of the blame lies with the drivers.

However, those who run this country, who make the rules and enforce the laws, and who are responsible for ensuring sound roads and safe practices have managed to avoid any blame.

But they shouldn't. They must be called to account for their failures to tackle road safety issues. They should not be allowed to continue to point their fingers at other people and other causes and to launch meaningless and expensive traffic safety campaigns year after year.

Years of driving in this country have given me doubts about the competence of officials in charge of road safety. They may have the technical knowledge from reading books and studying abroad. But can they apply that knowledge to suit local conditions? Are they actively promoting road safety? Ultimately, do they really care about safe practices?

Why, for example, do they allow U-turns in the middle of heavily travelled highways, such as Highways 1 and 2, forcing traffic in the fast lanes to slow down suddenly, come to a complete stop or switch to slower lanes, any of which could cause serious accidents?

It annoys me enormously when ­sometimes the lane I am driving along suddenly disappears or merges with another lane without warning.

Road construction or repair sites are dangerous areas because certain lanes must be closed and often there is little warning and cars have to merge or stop suddenly.

After sections of a highway are resurfaced with asphalt, road workers almost always fail to draw dividing lines until much later, so motorists are left to imagine the proper lanes. At night, you feel like you are driving blind.
I could go on with my observations, but you get my drift.

The girl on that coach would not have died if traffic lights and warning signs were there. Many accidents could be avoided if road safety officials pay ­attention to details when building or repairing roads.
Top officials should start taking the matter seriously instead of simply paying lip service.
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